The Art Works of  Ad Swan - A Show Case of  Permanent and Rotating Exhibits of Artist Andre' Swancy
THE MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND TECHNOLOGY, HALL OF TOOLS.
 
The Smithsonian Institution Archives Collections.
 
 
Exhibits Specialist:
John Fling and Andre Swancy - Photographs 1920s to 1970s
 
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subject: Swancy, Andre and Fling, John installing a model of an early milling machine.
 
 
Click on images for a larger view.
 
 
 
 
 
SMITHSONIAN STAFF MEMBERS PHOTO
1920-1970 A.D. SWANCY -  3rd roll second from the left. 
 
 
STAFF OF 29 LISTED IN STAFF PHOTO
 
 
Click on  image to enlarge.
 
(Photo given to staff at the time it was taken and remains in Swancy's files.)
 
EXHIBITS SWANCY IINSTALLED AT SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FROM HIS PERSONAL FILES.
 
 
 


NEW ENGLAND STONEWARE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
THE FRENCH INFLUENCE
 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION EXHIBIT BY ANDRE' SWANCY.
 
 
 
 
 
 




HORSE SOLDIERS











BREECH LOADING
AND REPEATING ARMS - THE CIVIL WAR










THE CROSSBOW












1920 - 1970
EXHIBITS
ANDRE' D. SWANCY











Andre' Swancy had only traveled to Washington, DC. Living there brought about adjusting to a different culture. There were no available housing anywhere no matter how hard he and his wife searched. A job in a big city and no place to live. How shocking that  was to Swancy. He thought of returning to Nebraska, he called his father-in-law to ask his advice, who referred Swancy to his long time friend Roy C. Garvin a Washington Attorney living in DC. Swancy father-in-law telephoned  Garvin and told him the situation. Garvin telephoned Swancy, gave him an address and said; the key would be in the mail box gave him the rent amount not to start for 3 months. What a blessing that was.

Swancy was concerned to location and conditions he might fine, but no matter what it was he could do repairs. 
 
The street was P Street, a beautiful row house, nice neighbors, in Georgetown. Two blocks from J.F. Kennedy who lived behind them on Q street.  The president often rode pass in a convertible, top down, on his way to work at the white House, several times stopping in front of Swancy's home saying hello to his 3 yr old youngest daughter. Attended dinners at the state capitol. Swancy loved doing everything first class. Yet, he remained down to earth and humble.
 
The Washington, DC. location provided Swancy within distant to drive to New York, Maryland, Canada, Pennsylvania and other surrounding states. which he took his family once a month. Visiting every museum! 
 
The museum visits, the art exhibits, artist friends Swancy knew at University of Kansas, made for great times in Washington, DC. An artist dream!
 
Swancy was involved with the march on Washington, talked with Stokey Carmichael, Malcolm X, and the others on that famous day at the park. He was invited to a dinner party at the Temple for Malcolm X. They spoke at great length and the children met each other and Mrs. Swancy, talked with Betty Shabazz.
 
Perhaps at that point in time Swancy would have considered becoming a Muslim, the hole back was Mrs. Swancy could not phantom giving up her lipstick for any reason. She agreed to purchasing the  Muslim news paper and the beans pies and visiting the Temple from time to time. Good compromise.
 
In regards, to Washington, DC., Swancy concluded, after getting a place to live, it is not what you know it is who you know. A man was good to him he never in life met because of his family and Garvin owed his father-in-law many favors. Swancy passed this kindness on to others he met until his dream came to an end.

Evelyn Swancy told her husband about Roy C. Garvin. He was former manager for the NAACP Washington branch. He spent several years as a Newspaper executive and in 1953 started a private law practice. She remembered him visiting their home when she was a growing up as young child.

A native of Kansas City, Kans., and a District  resident in 1937. Garvin was a graduate from Kansas City public schools and Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas. received his law degree from Terrell Law school in 1943 and was licensed to practice in Kansas the following year.

Mr. Garvin was decorated by the Republic of Haiti in 1951 and had honorary doctorates in law from Monrovia College Monrovia. Liberia, and Wilberforce (Ohio) University. He was Admitted to practice in the District in 1953. He also was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court.

A former advertising sales for the Kansas City Call, a weekly newspaper. Mr. Garvin joined the staff of the Baltimore Afro-American in 1938. He was transferred to the Washington Afro-American as manager of the advertising department. A few years later he was made manager of the Washington Afro until he resigned in 1952.

Garvin belong to many bar associations, Former member of the NAACP executive committee, A member of the Association for the study of Negro Life and history.

So much history develop by great men and it is the little things that they do that makes them even greater.
We never forgot Roy C. Garvin and his legacy is one to educate  and share today.

  
Swancy in his row house in Washington, DC. 1960's















Wife Evelyn lived in Washington DC with husband Swancy.
Model & and Substitute Teacher.












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